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Can Our Shopping Cards Save Our Lives? March 17, 2013

Posted by Peter Varhol in Software platforms, Technology and Culture.
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I’m a bit of a throwback when it comes to certain applications of technology.  In addition to not using Facebook, I don’t have supermarket rewards cards, or even use a credit or debit card at the supermarket.  My reasoning for the latter is simple – I would prefer not to have the supermarket chain know what I’m eating.  I realize that I may be giving up coupons or other special deals by not identifying myself, but I’m willing to accept that tradeoff.  It’s not a big deal either way, but it’s how I prefer to make that particular life decision.

But now there seems to be better reasons to use your supermarket reward card – according to this NBCNews.com article, it may save your life.  Really.

The story goes something like this.  When there is a known food contamination, health officials can see who bought that particular food, and approach those people individually, rather than send out vague alerts that not everyone sees or hears.

Count me as dubious.  This is really a sort of pie-in-the-sky application of Big Data that people can dream up when they picture the potential of the data itself.  It would take weeks to reach all of the buyers of a particular contaminated product, even if you could match all of the different systems and databases together somehow.  By then, the scare would have run its course.

The reality is that such data is stored in hundreds or thousands of different systems, without any means of pulling them together, let alone using it to query on a specific product across millions of purchases.

And then, of course, there are people like me, who still insist on dealing in cash, and remaining somewhat anonymous.  Although they could take my photo in the supermarket, and rather quickly match it up to my other identified photos on the Internet, where I am well known as a speaker and writer.

The idea is intriguing, but it falls into the same tradeoff as many other applications of technology in society today.  We can do things to make ourselves safer, but at the cost of providing more information.  Some don’t seem to have a problem with the latter, but I, in my doddering middle age, do.

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