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How Do We Fix Testing? April 17, 2014

Posted by Peter Varhol in Software development, Software tools.
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Here is a presentation abstract I hope to get accepted at a conference in the near future:

Perhaps in no other professional field is the dichotomy between theory and practice more starkly different than in the realm of software testing. Researchers and thought leaders claim that testing requires a high level of cognitive and interpersonal skills, in order to make judgments about the ability of software to fulfill its operational goals. In their minds, testing is about assessing and communicating the risks involved in deploying software in a specific state.

However, in many organizations, testing remains a necessary evil, and a cost to drive down as much as possible. Testing is merely a measure of conformance to requirements, without regard to the quality of requirements or how conformance is measured. This is certainly an important measure, but tells an incomplete story about the value of software in support of our business goals.

We as testers often help to perpetuate the status quo. Although in many cases we realize we can add far more value than we do, we continue to perform testing in a manner that reduces our value in the software development process.

This presentation looks at the state of the art as well of the state of common practice, and attempts to provide a rationale and roadmap whereby the practice of testing can be made more exciting and stimulating to the testing professional, as well as more valuable to the product and the organization.

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Comments»

1. Maja Schreiner - May 22, 2014

Great abstract. I’m sure it will be accepted soon. Would like to hear and read more about how to fix testing.


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