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A Youth Guide to Digital Privacy March 14, 2015

Posted by Peter Varhol in Technology and Culture.
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I’m an old(er) guy. I was well of age when Tim Berners-Lee published his seminal work on hypertext, and was probably on the leading edge of non-academic users when I loaded a third-party TCP/IP package (NetManage) onto my Windows 3.1 installation and connected to an Internet provider and connected to the World Wide Web (hint: It wasn’t easy, and I know you just take this for granted today).

So I would like to offer the youth of today (to be fair, thirty years or more my junior, and I’m not sure why anyone would want to listen to me) some advice on navigating a digital life.

  1. Someone is always watching you. Seriously. If you are out of your residence and not already on CCTV, you will be within a few minutes.
  2. If your cell phone is on, anyone who cares knows where you are. If they don’t care at the moment, they will still know if it becomes important. If your cell phone is not on, the NSA can still find you.
  3. I’m not just talking advertisers, with whom you may already have a relationship, or at least reached a détente. If important, you will be found, by authorities, friends, enemies, and spammers.
  4. Most important: if you do something bad, or stupid, you will almost certainly be found. Maybe prosecuted, more likely ridiculed, for the whole world to see if they desire. You may even be on a news website, not because what you did was in any way newsworthy, but because it offers offbeat or comic page views.
  5. You may or may not recover your life from that point.

I mention this because young people continue to do stupid things, just as they did when I was young. They may not have seemed stupid in my youth, where I did my share of stupid things, but wasn’t caught because they couldn’t catch me. Trust me; anything you do in public today is either on camera or identifiable through a GPS trace.

You might not think you will do anything stupid in public. Chances are, if you are under 30, you have already done so (over 30, the odds reach certainty). Circa 1980, I could drive down the wrong way on a freeway on-ramp, incredibly drunk, and not get caught unless there was a patrol car in the immediate vicinity (theoretical example; maybe). Don’t even think about it today.

Many people who have grown up with the Internet are seemingly comfortable with the positive aspects of universal connectivity, but don’t give any thought as to the other side of the coin.

Moral: We are being watched. And we don’t really understand the implications.

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