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Has the College Season Changed? April 5, 2015

Posted by Peter Varhol in Education, Technology and Culture.
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I first went to college over a generation ago, as one of the first of my extended family to attend college (my sister was first, followed by a cousin, but college was an option only for my generation; my parents never finished high school). It was a haphazard process; there wasn’t anyone to turn to for advice, and of course it was pre-Internet.

So, thirty-plus years ago, you would apply to maybe three-to-five schools, because each school had an application fee of anywhere between $25 and $100 bucks (I shouldn’t be embarrassed to say that $100 bucks meant whether or not our family was going to eat that week). Plus, each application was several pages long, and easily required several hours to write out by hand.

You found out about colleges through old-fashioned thumbing through old catalogs and brochures in the school library or guidance office. Your research was hardly comprehensive or unbiased, so you may well have ended up with a handful of schools that were nowhere near the best selections.

You may or may not have gotten accepted to all of them. Of those you were accepted to, you might want to visit one or two campuses, and not in this way.

Some things have changed in the next 30 years. The application process is typically online, and the fees tend to be more reasonable (at least in adjusted dollars). College visits tend to be more organized, with specific days set aside for group activities.

Many things do not appear to have changed. The timeframe for application and admissions seems to be approximately equal, although I would imagine that decisions can be made a lot more quickly by analyzing data on applicants. And there is just as much emphasis on campus visits and feeling “comfortable” with the campus and (to a much lesser extent) the people.

There is some justification for that. Teens are likely leaving home for the first time, and there is good reason for them to be emotionally and physically comfortable with that decision.

But in an era where college tuition has increased at double the rate of inflation through most of my adult life, and universities drag their feet in moving forward, I’m not sure that’s the deciding factor any more. Cost, utility, and flexibility may have overtaken the physical plant as the primary means of deciding on a college. There are many ways to begin and complete a degree, and the traditional four years (or more) residing on a campus seem, at least to me, to be less important than they were 30+ years ago.

I’m not a parent, and I haven’t had to go through this process with teens. But I suspect that parents, my age to perhaps a decade younger, are projecting their own experiences on their college age children, and are encouraging them to make exactly the wrong decisions for this day and age.

I also raise this because I’m concerned about higher education. I was a tenure-track professor, back in the day, I was discouraged by the total lack of imagination and innovation on college campuses. My department chair was convinced that we had perfected higher education twenty years ago, and no changes were necessary.  If these are our best and brightest, I wonder just what direction they are leading the youth of today.