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How Mature Are Your Testing Practices? April 22, 2015

Posted by Peter Varhol in Software development, Strategy.
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I once worked for a commercial software development company whose executive management decided to pursue the Software Engineering Institute’s (SEI) CMMI (Capability Maturity Model-Integration) certification for its software development practices. It hired and trained a number of project managers across multiple locations, documented everything it could, and slowed down its schedules so that teams could learn and practice the new documented processes, and collect the data needed to improve those processes.

There were good reasons for this software provider to try to improve its practices at the time. It had a quality problem, with thousands of known defects not getting addressed and going into production, and its customers not happy with the situation.

However, this new initiative didn’t turn out so well, as you might imagine. After spending millions of dollars over several years, the organization eventually achieved CMMI Level 2 (the activities were repeatable). It wasn’t clear that quality improved, although it likely would have become incrementally better over a longer period of time. But time moved on, and CMMI certification ceased to have the cachet that it once did. Today, in a stunning reversal of strategy, this provider now claims to be fully committed to Agile development practices.

This is a cautionary tale for any software project that looks for a specific process as a solution to their quality or delivery issues. A particular process or discipline won’t automatically improve your software. In the case of my previous employer, CMMI added burdensome overhead to a software supplier that was also forced to respond more quickly to changing technologies.

There are a number of different maturity models that claim to enable organizations to develop and extend processes that can make a difference in software quality and delivery. The SEI’s CMMI is probably the best known and most widely utilized. There is also a testing maturity model, which specifies similar principles as CMMI into the testing realm. And software tools vendor Coverity has recently released its Development Testing Maturity Model, which outlines a phased-in approach to development testing adoption, and claims to better support a DevOps strategy.

All of these maturity models, in moderation, can be useful for software projects and organizations seeking to standardize and advance the maturity of their project processes. But they don’t automatically improve quality or on-schedule delivery of a product or application.

Instead, teams and organizations should build a process that best reflects their business needs and culture, and then continue to refine that process as needs change to ensure that it continues to improve their ability to deliver quality software. It’s not as important to develop a maturity model as it is to identify your process, customize your ALM tools for that process, and make sure your team is appropriately trained in using it.

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