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Software Testing is a State of Mind July 2, 2015

Posted by Peter Varhol in Software development.
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I was prompted to write this by yet another post on whether or not testers should learn to code. While it gave cogent arguments on both sides, it (prematurely, I believe) concluded that testing is a fundamental skill for testers, and discussed how testers could develop their coding skills.

The reality is much more nuanced. There are different types of testers. An automation engineer is likely to be coding, or scripting, on a daily basis. A functional tester using an automated testing tool (commonly Selenium, or perhaps a commercial one) will write or modify scripts generated by the tool.

And in general, we try to automate repeatable processes. Often this can be done with customizable workflows in an ALM product, but there might be some amount of scripting required.

But while coding knowledge can improve a tester’s skill set, it’s not required for all roles. And sometimes it can detract from other, more important skills. That got me to thinking about the unique skill sets of testers. There are unique mental and experiential skills that testers bring to their job. The best testers intuitively recognize the skills needed, and work hard to develop them.

  • Curiosity. Good testers do more than execute test cases. They look for inconsistencies or incongruities, question why, and don’t stop looking for improvements until the software is deployed.
  • Logic and Discipline. Testers do very detailed work, and approach that work in a step-by-step logical fashion. Their thought processes have to be clear and sharp, and they have to move methodically from one step to the next.
  • Imagination. Testers understand the user personas and put themselves in their role. The best can work through the application as both a new and experienced user, and find things no one ever considered.
  • Confidence. Testers often have to present unpopular points of view. If they can do so while believing in their own skills and conclusions, while also taking into account differing points of view, they can be successful voice of both the user and application quality.
  • Dealing with Ambiguity. It’s rarely clear what a requirement says, whether the test case really addresses it, whether an issue is really an issue, and what priority it is. Testers have to be ready to create a hypothesis, and provide evidence to support or reject that hypothesis.

These tend to be different skill sets than those possessed by coders. In particular, many coders tend to focus very narrowly on their particular assignments, because of the level of detail required to understand and successfully implement their part of the application. Coders also dislike ambiguity; code either works or it doesn’t, it either satisfies a requirement or it doesn’t. Computers aren’t ambiguous, so coders can’t write code that doesn’t clearly produce a specific end result.

Coders may argue that they produce a tangible result, source code that makes an application concept a reality. Whereas the work product of testers is usually a bit more amorphous. Ideally, a tester would like to say that software meets requirements and is of high quality, in which case few defects will be found. If testers write many defects, it’s interpreted as negative news rather than a desired result.

But organizations can’t look at testers as second class participants because of that. Testers have a unique skill set that remains essential in getting good and useful software into the hands of users. I don’t think that skill set has been very well documented to date, however. And it may not be appreciated because of that.

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Comments»

1. Should Coders Learn to Test? | Cutting Edge Computing - July 8, 2015

[…] posting that asked if testers should learn to code, and is a follow-on to my previous post on the unique skill set that software testers possess. If we seriously question whether testers should learn to code (and most opinions fall on the […]


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