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Learning How to Learn June 21, 2017

Posted by Peter Varhol in Education, Technology and Culture.
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One of the significant values I got out of my college experiences was a foundation whereby I could build on with lifetime learning.  I’m not quite sure how it happened, but my life outlook seems to have combined a love of learning with the ability to build upon that initial foundation.  A part of it, I’m sure, is that I read a lot and forget little, but something more happened to enable me to readily integrate new knowledge in both the social and natural sciences into a growing world view.

Yes, I know, that is gobblety gook, but I learned that studying social science for my BA.  Gobblety gook was the primary language of communication when I was taking social science.

Nonetheless, it serves to draw a distinction between singing Kumbaya and preparing yourself for a lifetime in the real world.  Kumbaya may help us connect with others in the moment, but does little to prepare us for the future.

It goes beyond how do we learn.  It asks the question “How do we learn to learn?”  I did poorly in college in my freshman year (no, I was not a particular partier).  Rather, I tried valiantly to understand concepts, as my professors insisted.  When I finally realized they really wanted me to memorize facts, I did so voraciously, and averaged superior grades for the rest of my college career.

Somewhere along the way to memorizing facts, I would like to think that I learned how to learn, over the course of a lifetime (38 years after college and counting).  But I can’t apply my own individual circumstances to any proven curriculum.

But I have to think there is a way, perhaps this way.  Old fashioned, perhaps, but really, how often do our intellectual peers think about how to think?  Can we learn how to think by focusing deeply on a relatively few classic volumes?

I don’t know.  But to be fair, almost anything has to be better than what the vast majority of our higher education curricula are doing today.

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