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The Future is Now June 23, 2017

Posted by Peter Varhol in Algorithms, Technology and Culture.
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And it is messy.  This article notes that it has been 15 years since the release of Minority Report, and today we are using predictive analytics to determine who might commit a crime, and where.

Perhaps it is the sign of the times.  Despite being safer than ever, we are also more afraid than ever.  We may not let our electronics onto commercial planes (though they are presumably okay in cargo).  We want to flag and restrict contact with people deemed high-risk.  We want to stay home.  We want the police to have more powers.

In a way it’s understandable.  This is a bias described aptly by Daniel Kahneman.  We can extrapolate from the general to the particular, but not from the particular to the general.  And there is also the primacy bias.  When we see a mass attack, was are likely to instinctively interpret that as an increase in attacks in general, rather than looking at the trends over time.

I’m reminded of the Buffalo Springfield song: “Paranoia strikes deep, into your lives it will creep.”

But there is a problem using predictive analytics in this fashion, as Tom Cruise discovered.  And this gets back to Nicholas Carr’s point – we can’t effectively automate what we can’t do ourselves.  If a human cannot draw the same or more accurate conclusions, we have no right to rely blindly on analytics.

I suspect that we are going to see increased misuses of analytics in the future, and that is regrettable.  We have to have data scientists, economists, and computer professionals step up and say that a particular application is inappropriate.

I will do so when I can.  I hope others will, too.

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