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Solving a Management Problem with Automation is Just Plain Wrong January 18, 2018

Posted by Peter Varhol in Strategy, Technology and Culture.
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This article is so fascinatingly wrong on so many levels that it is worth your time to read it.  On the surface, it may appear to offer some impartial logic, that we should automate because humans don’t perform consistently.

“At some point, every human being becomes unreliable.”  Well, yes.  Humans aren’t machines.  They have good days and bad days.  They have exceptional performances and poor performances.

Machines, on the other hand, are stunningly consistent, and least under most circumstances.  Certainly software bugs, power outages, and hardware breakdowns happen, and machines will fail to perform under many of those circumstances, but they are relatively rare.

But there is a problem here.  Actually, several problems.  The first is that machines will do exactly the same thing, every time, until the cows come home.  That’s what they are programmed to do, and they do it reasonably well.

Humans, on the other hand, experiment.  And through experimentation and inspiration come innovation, a better way of doing things.  Sometimes that better way is evolutionary, and sometimes it is revolutionary.  But that’s how society evolves and becomes better.  The machine will always do exactly the same thing, so there will never be better and innovative solutions.  We become static, and as a society old and tired.

Second, humans connect with other humans in a way machines cannot (the movie Robot and Frank notwithstanding).  This article starts with a story of a restaurant whose workers showed up when they felt like it.  Rather that addressing that problem directly, the owner implemented a largely automated (and hands off) assembly line of food.

What has happened here is that the restaurant owner has taken a management problem and attempted to solve it with the application of technology.  And by not acknowledging his own management failings, he will almost certainly fail in his technology solution too.

Except for probably fast food restaurants, people eat out in part for the experience.  We do not eat out only, and probably not even primarily, for sustenance, but rather to connect with our family and friends, and with random people we encounter.

If we cannot do that, we might as well just have glucose and nutrients pumped directly into our veins.

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