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The Golden Age of Databases May 10, 2018

Posted by Peter Varhol in Architectures, Software platforms, Software tools.
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Let’s face it, to most developers, databases are boring and opaque.  As long as I can create a data object to call the database and bring data into my application, I really don’t care about the underlying structures.  And many of us have an inherent bias against DBAs, for multiple reasons.  Years ago, one of my computer science graduate students made the proclamation, “I’m an engineer; I write technical applications.  I have no need for databases at all.”

I don’t think this is true anymore, if it ever was.  The problem was in the predominance of SQL relational databases.  The mathematical and logical foundation of relational databases is actually quite interesting, but from a practical standpoint actually setting up a database, whether through E-R diagrams or other approach, is pretty cut and dried.  And maintaining and performance tuning databases can often seem like an exercise in futility.

Certainly there were other types of databases and derivative products 20 or 30 years ago.  My old company, Progress Software, still makes a mint off its OpenEdge database and 4GL environment.  Sybase PowerBuilder was popular for at least two decades, and Borland Delphi still has a healthy following.  OLAP engines were available in the 1990s, working with SQL relational databases to quickly extract and report on relational data.

But traditional relational databases have disadvantages for today’s uses.  They are meant to be a highly reliable storage and retrieval system.  They tend to have the reliable part down pat, and there are almost universal means of reading, writing, modifying, and monitoring data in relational tables.

The world of data has changed.  While reliability and programming access of relational databases remains important in traditional enterprise applications, software has become essential in a wide variety of other areas.  This includes self-driving cars, financial trading, manufacturing, retail, and commercial applications in general.

Relational databases have been used in these areas, but have limitations that are becoming increasingly apparent as we stress them in ways they weren’t designed for.  So instead we are seeing alternatives that specialize in a specific area of storage and retrieval.  For example, the No-SQL MongoDB and MapReduce in general are making it possible to store large amounts of unstructured data, and to quickly search and retrieve data from that storage.  The open source InfluxDB provides a ready store for event-driven data, enabling applications to stream data based on a time series.  Databases such as FaunaDB can be used to implement blockchain.

All of these databases can run in the cloud, or on premises.  They tend to be easy to set up and use, and you can almost certainly find one to meet your specific needs.

So as you develop your next ground-breaking application, don’t find yourself limited by a relational database.  You’re not stuck in the same rut that you were ten years ago.  Take a look at what has to be called the Golden Age of databases.

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