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Memorial Day 2018 May 28, 2018

Posted by Peter Varhol in Uncategorized.
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I am a veteran.  I served six years as an Air Force officer, separating as a captain.  I wanted to fly; I had my private ticket at 17, but lacked the perfect eyesight needed to fly in the military.  So I flew a desk, got two masters degrees, and eventually got past the stage of my life where flying was important.

I was in San Antonio this past weekend, on a riverboat cruise, when the guide asked how many on the tour were active duty or veterans.  Despite the fact that San Antonio stands on the pillars of multiple Army and Air Force bases, only three of the 50 or so raised their hands (and one of them was a just-graduated ROTC cadet in uniform).  I was at a DevOps conference in Nashville last fall, in a room of 300 mostly young people, where the Iraqi War vet organizer asked how many were veterans.  My hand went up.  Period.

I served my country honorably (the DD-214 says so), but thinking back, I could have done so better.  I may not have been motivated by patriotism, but over the years that initial service has made me a different, and I think better, person.

We’ve had stupid wars (Spanish-American War, anyone?) and we’ve had unpopular wars (Vietnam certainly takes the cake here), and will continue to do so.  That is not for those who have chosen to serve to decide, although as human beings, many I’m sure have had opinions in the matter.  That’s what veterans have helped to protect, current events notwithstanding.

Service to our country would do all of us good.  It does not mean love, or patriotism; rather, it means that we recognize that we could not have our freedoms without sacrifice.  For most of us in the military, the sacrifices are minimal – a regimented lifestyle, a nod to authority, restrictions on our time and efforts.  But service doesn’t have to be in the military; all adults should seek out any opportunities to preserve our freedoms and ideals.

Those who have fallen in battle made the ultimate sacrifice.  I’m pretty sure that none intended to die for their country, but they did, and today is the day we remember them.  We may object to war in general, or government in general, or a specific war or government, but those who have died don’t deserve to be in that discussion.  So for one day, put aside politics and beliefs, and remember those who have died so that we could have the rights and privileges that we do.  Thank you.

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