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Empathetic Technology is an Idea Whose Time Should Never Come June 20, 2018

Posted by Peter Varhol in Technology and Culture.
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I love TED talks.  They are generally well thought out and well-presented, and offer some significant insights on things that may not have occurred to me before.

I really, really wanted to give a thumbs-up to Poppy Crum’s talk on empathetic technology, but it contradicted some of my fundamental beliefs on human behavior and growth.  She talks about how measuring and understanding the physical attributes of emotion will help draw us together, so that we don’t have to feel so alone and misunderstood.

Well, I suppose that’s one way to look at it.  I rather look at it as wearing a permanent lie detector.  Now, that may not be a bad thing, unless you are playing poker or negotiating a deal.  But exposing our innermost emotions to others is rightly a gradual thing, and should be under our control, rather than immediately available through technology.

Also, the example that she demonstrates in the audience requires data from the entire audience, rather than from a single individual.  And her example was highly contrived, and it’s not at all clear that it would work in practice.  It involved measuring changes in CO2 emissions from the audience based on reacting to something unexpected.

But in general, her thesis violates my thoughts on emotional friction.  Other people don’t understand us.  Other people do things that make us feel uncomfortable.  Guess what?  Adapting to that is how we grow as human beings.  And growth is what makes us human.  Now, granted, in a few cases where attempts at emotional growth result in psychopathologies, there seems like there could be value here.  But . . .

I recall the Isaac Asimov novel The Naked Sun, where humans who interact physically with others are considered pathologic.  So we become content to view each other electronically, rather than interact physically.  I see a significant loss of humanity there.

And despite how Poppy Crum paints it, I see a significant loss of humanity with her plan, too.  She is correct in that empathetic technology can help identify those whose psyches may break under the strain of adapting to friction, but I think the loss of our humanity in general overwhelms this single good.

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