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My Boss is a Computer August 11, 2018

Posted by Peter Varhol in Machine Learning, Technology and Culture.
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Well, not really, but if you can be fired by a computer, it must be your boss.  Not my story, but one that foretells the future nonetheless.  An apparently uncorrectable software defect led to a contract employee being locked out of his computer and his building, and labeled inactive in the payroll.

It was almost comically funny that his manager and other senior managers and executives at the company, none of whom fired him, could not get this fiat reversed.  A full three weeks passed, in which he received no pay and no explanation, before they were able to determine that his employment status had never been updated in their new HR management software.  Even after he was reinstated, his colleagues treated him as someone not entitled to work there, and he eventually left.

It seems that intelligent (or otherwise) software is encroaching into the ultimate and unabashed people-oriented field – human resources.  And there’s not a darned thing we can do about it.  Software is not only conducting full interviews, but also performing the entire hiring process.  While we might hope that we aren’t actually selected (or rejected) by computer algorithms, that is the goal of these software systems.

So here’s the problem.  Or several problems.  First, software isn’t perfect, and while most software bugs in released software are no more than annoying, bugs in this kind of software can have drastic consequences on people.  Those consequences will likely spill over to the hiring company itself.

Second, these applications are usually machine learning systems that have had their algorithms trained through the application of large amounts of data.  The most immediate problem is that the use of biased data will simply perpetuate existing practices.  That’s a problem because everything about the interview and selection process is subjective and highly prone to bias.

Last, if the software doesn’t allow for human oversight and the ability to override, then in effect a company has ceded its hiring decisions to software that it most likely doesn’t understand.  That’s a recipe for disaster, as management has lost control over the reasons why management exists in the first place.

Now, there may be some that will say that’s actually a good thing.  Human management is, well, human, with human failings, and sometimes they manifest themselves in negative ways.  Bosses are dictatorial, or racist, or some combination of negative qualities, and are often capricious in dealing with others.  Computer software is at least consistent, if not necessarily fair as we might define it.

But no matter how poor the decisions that might come from human managers, we own them.  If it’s software, no one owns them.  When we are locked in to following the dictates of software, without any understanding as to who programmed it to do what, then we give up on our fellow citizens and colleagues.  Worse, we give up the control that we are paid to maintain.

Lest we face a dystopian future where computer software rules our working lives, and we are powerless to act as the humans we are, then we must control the software that is presumably helping us.

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