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I Don’t Need a Hero October 23, 2018

Posted by Peter Varhol in Software development, Software platforms, Strategy.
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Apologies to Bonnie Tyler, but we don’t need heroes, as we have defined them in our culture.  “He’s got to be strong, he’s got to be fast, and he’s got to be fresh from the fight.”  Um, no.

Atul Gawande, author of The Checklist Manifesto, makes it clear that the heroes, those in any profession that create a successful outcome primarily on the strength of their superhuman effort, don’t deserve to be recognized as true heroes.  In fact, we should try to avoid circumstances that appear to require a superhuman effort.

So what are heroes?  We would like to believe that they exist.  Myself, I am enamored with the astronauts of a bygone era, who faced significant uncertainties in pushing the envelope of technology, and accepted that their lives were perpetually in hock.  But, of course, they were the same ones who thought that they were better than those who sacrificed their lives, because they survived.

Today, according to Gawande, the heroes are those who can follow checklists in order to make sure that they don’t forget any step in a complex process.  The checklists themselves can be simple, in that they exist to prompt professionals to remember and execute seemingly simple steps that are often forgotten in the heat of crisis.

In short, Gawande believes in commercial airline pilots, such as Chesley (Sully) Sullenberger, who with his copilot Jeffrey Skiles glided their wounded plane to a ditching in the Hudson River off Midtown Manhattan.  Despite the fact that we all know Sully’s name in the Miracle on the Hudson, it was a team effort by the entire flight crew.  And they were always calm, and in control.

Today, software teams are made up on individuals, not close team members.  Because they rarely work as a team, it’s easy for one or more individuals to step up and fix a problem, without the help of the team.

There are several problems with that approach, however.  First, if an extra effort by one person is successful, the team may not try as hard in the future, knowing that they will be bailed out of difficult situations.  Second, the hero is not replicable; you can’t count on it again and again in those situations.  Third, the hero can’t solve every problem; other members of the team will eventually be needed.

It feels good to be the hero, the one who by virtue of extreme effort fixes a bad situation.  The world loves you.  You feel like you’ve accomplished something significant.  But you’re not at all a hero if your team wasn’t there for you.

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