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The Path to Autonomous Automobiles Will Be Longer Than We Think July 14, 2019

Posted by Peter Varhol in Algorithms, Machine Learning, Software platforms, Technology and Culture.
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I continue to be amused by people who believe that fully autonomous automobiles are right around the corner.  “They’re already in use in many cities!” they exclaim (no, they’re not).  In a post earlier this year, I’ve listed four reasons why we will be unlikely to see fully autonomous vehicles in my lifetime; at the very top of the list is mapping technology, maps, and geospatial information.

That makes the story of hundreds of cars trying to get to Denver International Airport being misdirected by Google Maps all that much more amusing.  Due to an accident on the main highway to DIA, Google Maps suggested an alternative, which eventually became a muddy mess that trapped over 100 cars in the middle of the prairie.

Of course, Google disavowed any responsibility, claiming that it makes no promises with regard to road conditions, and that users should check road conditions ahead of time.  Except that it did say that this dirt road would take about 20 minutes less than the main road.  Go figure.  While not a promise, it does sound like a factual statement on, well, road conditions.  And, to be fair, they did check road conditions ahead of time – with Google!

While this is funny (at least reading about it), it points starkly to the limitations of digital maps for use with car navigation.  Autonomous cars require maps with exacting detail, within feet or even inches.  Yet if Google as one of the best examples of mapping cannot get an entire route right, then there is no hope for fully autonomous cars to use these same maps sans driver.

But, I hear you say, how often does this happen?  It happens often.  I’ve often taken a Lyft to a particular street address in Arlington, Massachusetts, a close-in suburb of Boston.  The Lyft (and, I would guess, Uber) maps have it as a through street, but in ground truth it is bisected by the Minuteman Bikeway and blocked to vehicular traffic.  Yet every single Lyft tries to take me down one end of that street in vain.  Autonomous cars need much better navigation than this, especially in and around major cities.

And Google can’t have it both ways, supplying us with traffic conditions yet disavowing any responsibility in doing so.  Of course, that approach is part and parcel to any major tech company, so we shouldn’t be surprised.  But we should be very wary in the geospatial information they provide.

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