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Higher Education Ignores Results It Doesn’t Like June 7, 2017

Posted by Peter Varhol in Education.
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I am a strong believer in higher education.  At the same time, I recognize that what passes for higher education in some classes and even entire universities is a farce that suffers from lack of, well, caring.

In particular, some universities claim that they provide a high quality education by fiat alone, and discount or ignore evidence to the contrary.  And no one is willing or able to hold them accountable.  This WSJ article (paywall) notes that those schools whose students don’t show improvement in critical thinking discount the value of the test and stop administering it.  And no one calls them to task.

But the cry from my own experiences in academia still rings in my ears – “We don’t have customers, we have students!”

This kind of close-minded thinking is all too common in our higher education.  We like to think that educated people are by nature intelligent and thoughtful human beings.  Too often, they are just the opposite.

Further, parents lack the information or ability to critically evaluate the education alternatives available to their children, and defer to what those children feel comfortable with.  That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but it does mean that parents may be shelling out tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars for a subpar education, or even no education at all.

To be fair, your experience in college is largely what you make of it.  You can go to Harvard, and party your way through with little impact on your ability to receive a degree.  You can go to Plymouth State, apply yourself, and obtain the foundation for a successful lifetime of learning and critical thinking.  In that sense, it doesn’t matter where you go.

But the American family is largely a poor consumer of higher education.  We spend more time and effort buying a car than we do buying an education, yet the implications of a poor choice are far more significant with the latter.  I wish we would find a way to penalize universities that make obviously unsupported claims on their quality, but regrettably, we genuflect to higher education so instinctively that we as consumers just don’t imagine going there.